Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions]


10 thoughts on “Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions]

  1. says: Read & Download A Colorful History of Popular Delusions Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions]

    Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions] People are crazy and times are strange – Bob DylanIf this book is any indication people have always been crazy and times have always been strangeThis book is a history and analysis of one particular subject the way people sometimes behave when they get together in groups whether those groups be local people gathered together in one particular set of geographical co ordinates or nonlocal people gathered together in man

  2. says: Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions] Read & Download A Colorful History of Popular Delusions

    Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions] This book has a uite interesting topic some chapters funny others a little heavier as some delusions can be sca

  3. says: Read & Download A Colorful History of Popular Delusions Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions] Robert E. Bartholomew ë 0 Summary

    Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions] Read & Download A Colorful History of Popular Delusions If the advice in this section is to be useful it is important to heed the lessons and remember we are all susceptibleSimultaneously entertaining and sobering even horrifying Bartholomew's latest volume is a compilation of those occasions when groups of people have convinced themselves of some very peculiar things Categorized as Rumor Crazes Urban Myth Classical Mass Hysteria and Moral Panics among others and

  4. says: Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions] Free download Ü PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ë Robert E. Bartholomew Robert E. Bartholomew ë 0 Summary

    Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions] Robert E. Bartholomew ë 0 Summary This is indeed a fascinating and comprehensive collection of “deluded” crowd behaviours It includes over 100 well documented and referenced examples of such behaviours grouped together into a taxonomy of 14 different ‘categories’ Those categories include rumours and gossip urban legends fads crazes and manias eac

  5. says: Robert E. Bartholomew ë 0 Summary Free download Ü PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ë Robert E. Bartholomew Read & Download A Colorful History of Popular Delusions

    Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions] Free download Ü PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ë Robert E. Bartholomew Read & Download A Colorful History of Popular Delusions An intriguing topic a wealth of historical anecdotes and examples and deep knowledge of the sociological phenomenons that

  6. says: Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions] Read & Download A Colorful History of Popular Delusions

    Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions] This is a good general introduction to what the hell's wrong with people sometimes Groups as large as nations and as small as duos can find several kinds of ways to get inaccurate notions into their heads Here the authors provide a comprehensive overview of the various forms of popular delusions Each section begi

  7. says: Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions]

    Robert E. Bartholomew ë 0 Summary Free download Ü PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ë Robert E. Bartholomew Read & Download A Colorful History of Popular Delusions Basically a 21st century update to McCaulley's Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds Covers panics manias rumors urban legends and other bizarre popular delusions updated to the present Madness in crowds doesn't go away in our not so enlightened times

  8. says: Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions]

    Read & Download A Colorful History of Popular Delusions Robert E. Bartholomew ë 0 Summary Free download Ü PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ë Robert E. Bartholomew A great overview of popular delusions What do the hula hoop and UFO abductions have in common? Read this to find out

  9. says: Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions] Robert E. Bartholomew ë 0 Summary Read & Download A Colorful History of Popular Delusions

    Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions] Robert E. Bartholomew ë 0 Summary Read & Download A Colorful History of Popular Delusions This was academic than I was expecting and the format made it very easy to put down and forget to pick it back up again I s

  10. says: Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions]

    Pdf/E–book [A Colorful History of Popular Delusions] I

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Read & Download A Colorful History of Popular Delusions

Robert E. Bartholomew ë 0 Summary A Colorful History of Popular Delusions Summary ´ 100 Show up in our own era Examples include the social networking hysteria of 2012 which resulted in uncontrollable twitching by teenage girls in Leroy NY; the phantom bus terrorist of 2004 in Vancouver Canada; and the itching outbreak of 2000 in South Africa Vivid detailed and thoroughly researched this is a fascinating overview of collective human behavior in its many unusual forms. A great overview of popular delusions What do the hula hoop and UFO abductions have in common Read this to find out

Free download Ü PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ë Robert E. Bartholomew

A Colorful History of Popular Delusions

Robert E. Bartholomew ë 0 Summary A Colorful History of Popular Delusions Summary ´ 100 This eclectic history of unusual crowd behavior describes a rich assortment of mass phenomena ranging from the amusing and uirky to the shocking and deplorable What do fads crazes manias urban legends moral panics riots stampedes and other mass expressions of emotion have in common By creating a typology of such behavior past and present the authors show how common extraordinary gr. People are crazy and times are strange Bob DylanIf this book is any indication people have always been crazy and times have always been strangeThis book is a history and analysis of one particular subject the way people sometimes behave when they get together in groups whether those groups be local people gathered together in one particular set of geographical co ordinates or nonlocal people gathered together in many different locations around a particular set of beliefs or behaviours or a combination of both In his own words This book is a guide to recognizing and understanding the dynamics of collective obsessions and follies from outlandish beliefs and baseless convictions to short term preoccupations with trivial objects or ideas such as fads The typological breakdown is uite detailed social panics enthusiasms rumours gossip fads crazes manias urban legends flight panicsstampedes anxiety hysteria repressionoppression based hysteria community threats moral panics and riots Some of these are completely benign The hula hoop fad is an example of this However some are far from benign Social panics that incubate in an atmosphere of anxiety and uncertainty are an example Panic about Muslims in the United States is a current example of this Before the Muslims it was the Catholics Before the Catholics it was well who The uakers Witches Jews How far back do you want to go Some things could be benign or malevolent A rumour could be relatively benign Tom slept with Jill and now Tom and Sally are no longer a couple but it could be very deadly the rumours that Jews were poisoning wells in Europe during the Middle Ages ended up in the torture execution or deportation of many peoplePoisoned Halloween candy Paul McCartney being replaced by an imposter after he died in a car crash poisoned food products barking nuns alligators in the sewers mass group suicides inner city riots the only thing you won t read about in this book is the kitchen sink This book was interesting at times amusing and to be completely honest also a little scary We re all human We are all capable of being carried away on a tidal wave of group think and mass hysteria Is it entirely obvious at any given moment that we haven t been It is easy to look back at earlier periods in history and shake our heads at human folly but perhaps we fail to imagine that someone might be doing the same about us one day because of course we have the tendency to think we have finally arrived at peak rationality I do have one criticism The author failed to introduce and deal with evidence that might dispute some of his assertions If a person were to read this book with no further knowledge of some of the occurrences he documents in this book they might assume he has laid all the cards on the table I could give him the benefit of the doubt and assume he was unaware of any such evidence But then if you are really trying to write a straightforward unbiased history isn t it your job to do the research and look at all of the data Still worth reading if only as an illumination of such follies as flesh is heir toI began this review with a uotation I might as well make them bookendsThe crowd is untruth Soren Kierkegaard

Robert E. Bartholomew ë 0 Summary

Robert E. Bartholomew ë 0 Summary A Colorful History of Popular Delusions Summary ´ 100 Oup reactions to fear or excitement are And they offer insights into how these sometimes dangerous mob responses can be avoided We may not be surprised to read about the peculiarities of the European Middle Ages when superstition was commonplace like the meowing nuns of France tarantism a dancing mania in Italy or the malicious anti Semitic poison well scares But similar phenomena. This is indeed a fascinating and comprehensive collection of deluded crowd behaviours It includes over 100 well documented and referenced examples of such behaviours grouped together into a taxonomy of 14 different categories Those categories include rumours and gossip urban legends fads crazes and manias each has a different definition stampedes panics and riots and the intriguing anxiety hysterias and classical mass hysteriasIn each chapter the authors first take us through their definition of a given category and then present a group of well referenced historical examples describing the circumstances of each mass delusion from start to finishSome of the cases revealed are truly fascinating There are witch hunts UFO and Big Foot sightings the urban legends of alligators in sewer systems and various disturbing cases of motor hysteria in which those affected suffer tremors and fits as a result of their mass delusionsThere is also the case of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast this did indeed cause a major community panic and even loss of life but not in the United States as I and perhaps many others had always understood In 1938 Orson Wells gained some notoriety by broadcasting a contemporary version of HG Welles story of invading Martians The incident was re popularised in the 1970s made for TV movie The Night that Panicked America But the authors of the current book give that incident barely a passing mention as a rather limited small group panic Obviously it caused a stir but was by no means an actual panicking of all of AmericaThe story of real significance actually occurred in Ecuador in 1949 when a similar realistic sounding broadcast of invading aliens was made by a radio station that truly panicked the city of uito When the locals learned they had been deceived they became a rioting angry mob trashed the radio station and brought about the deaths of 20 people The impact of the South American incident was clearly profound than the Orson Wells broadcast but the former seems to be all but unknown todayThe book is not without its flaws and weaknesses however Here are three in order of importance beginning with the trivial Proofreading I ve come to expect the occasional typo in just about every piece of professional writing I read these days This book seems to have to its fair share especially in the first half And there is also at least one howler where the concluding sentence of a paragraph appears to contradict the original point being made These editing errors aren t so numerous to be that big a deal of course Or at least they shouldn t be But I found they occurred just often enough to be an annoying distraction Referencing The liberal use of references is a testament to the authors expertise and depth of research in the field However I was still bugged by a couple of points When a book contains citations I m the type of reader that keeps one thumb in the references and the other as a current page marker flipping in real time between the two whenever a citation appearsTo repeat The references are one of the strong points of the book But I was disappointed by a the high degree of reliance on secondary sources many of which didn t feel fully accurate or persuasive and b the over use of ibid If there are only one or two pieces of source material describing a particular event we only need one or two citations at the end of the paragraph We don t need one every second sentence pointing back to the same source Treatment of Religious Beliefs While we have here a well curated collection of irrational human behaviour in tribes and crowds I feel that the mass delusions of religious beliefs are let off far too easily Sure there is certainly coverage of some religious inspired oddities like self flagellation the Salem witch hunts worshiping the image of Jesus in a tortilla and the Heaven s Gate and Jonestown mass suicides However the field of religious beliefs and practices the traditions the psychology the counter intuitive rationalisations is rich for further expansion and much has been left on the table that could have been explored in this contextOne might fairly argue that dealing with religious beliefs wasn t the intention here But if that is so then the error is in the title of the book itself Rather than being A Colorful History of Popular Delusions a accurate label might have been A Colourful Collection of Irrational Crowd Behaviour After all not all rumours and pieces of gossip or fads or stampedes or riots for example are necessarily driven by delusion On the other hand why should it be assumed that poisoning oneself in order to board a comet to heaven is any delusional than say the belief that a piece of bread is an actual not metaphorical piece of the body of Jesus Christ or that Muhammed actually ascended to heaven on a winged horse Delusions of this type are some of the most popular of all time and are sadly all but neglected here not simply by example but as representative of some of the most powerful aspects of human tribal psychologyDespite its limitations this is still an excellent collection of material that I can see myself dipping back into from time to time whenever I want to recall examples of popular irrational crowd behaviour3 out of 5

  • Paperback
  • 363
  • A Colorful History of Popular Delusions
  • Robert E. Bartholomew
  • en
  • 06 September 2020
  • 9781633881228