[This Republic of Suffering Death and the American Civil War] EBOOK / KINDLE

  • Hardcover
  • 346
  • This Republic of Suffering Death and the American Civil War
  • Drew Gilpin Faust
  • English
  • 08 October 2019
  • 9780375404047

Drew Gilpin Faust Ç 5 Read & Download

Read Þ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ç Drew Gilpin Faust Read & Download This Republic of Suffering Death and the American Civil War ê PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Drew Gilpin Faust Ç 5 Read & Download Understanding of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship She describes how survivors mourned and how a deeply religious culture struggled to reconcile the slaughter with its belief in a benevolent God pondered who should die and under what circumstances and reconceived its understanding of life after death Faust details the logistical challenges involved when thousands were left dead many with their identities unknown on the fields of places like Bull Run Shiloh Antietam and Gettysburg She chronicles the efforts to identify reclaim preserve and bur. The Civil War And The Harvest Of DeathMost books on the American Civil War can be grouped into one of two categories The first category consists of studies of the military history of the conflict freuently focusing on individual battles or campaigns The second category focuses on the political aspects of the conflict with much recent literature centered upon Emancipation and with the long delay following the Civil War in securing civil rights for the former slavesDrew Gilpin Faust s This Republic of Suffering Death and the American Civil War cuts across these two categories by studying in detail the extent of the death and suffering resulting from America s greatest conflict Most studies of the Civil War of the first or second category do pay attention to Civil War death but in the context of other themes There are relatively few studies which take death as the primary theme for a study of the entire War Faust has good precedent for her theme in Gregory Coco s A Strange and Blighted Land and other works by Coco among other writers of the aftermath of the Battle of GettysburgFaust emphasizes the strongly religious and evangelical character of mid 19th Century United States and of the familiarity that society in contrast to how many people view contemporary America felt with death She emphasizes the concept of the good death after a full life and in the presence of family with the deceased having the opportunity to turn his thoughts towards repentance and religion The Civil War and its carnage ran suarely into the concept of the good death as soldiers in the hundreds of thousands died from disease or bullets far from home in a manner that was depersonalizing painful and bleak Casualty rates in the Civil War were extraordinarily high and difficult even today to measure precisely especially for the SouthFaust describes how at the outset of the war neither the North nor the South expected a lengthy conflict and thus made no provision for handling the massive casualties that occurred Ambulance service the retrieval of the dead and wounded medical care identification of the dead proper burial and the notification of kin were all seriously deficient Faust describes these and many other aspects of death and of the brutality of the conflict and of the efforts made as the War dragged on to improve the care given to the dead and dyingFaust is insightful on the efforts of non government groups such as the US Sanitary Commission and the Christian Commission and of individuals such as Clara Barton to relieve suffering during the war and to treat each soldier as a treasured individual rather than as a cog in the military effort Similar efforts were made on a smaller scale in the South She also describes well the efforts made after the war by persons such as Edward Whitman by the Federal government and by women s groups in the former Confederacy to find the dead freuently buried in hastily constructed graves and to identify and inter them with respect and honor This effort Faust argues presaged an expansive role for the government in the theretofore private affairs of individuals and marked a change in the way the culture viewed and responded to deathThe most impressive part of the book is the use Faust makes of contemporaneous literary accounts of the Civil War Her book is replete with references to Civil War poetry which whatever its shortcomings may be as literature is a precious guide to how people living through the war responded to it In addition to the popular literature of the day she draws upon the works of Lincoln the Second Inaugural AddressWhitman Melville Ambrose Bierce Emily Dickinson John DeForest author of the 1867 novel Miss Ravenel s Conversion and Oliver Wendell Holmes to show how the destruction wrought by the Civil War was viewed by contemporariesIn a recent article in the New York Review James McPherson has pointed out that Faust s book gives insufficient weight to other important results of the Civil War over and beyond the appalling casualties Thus she does not address the preservation of the Union and the expansion of democracy the adoption of the 13th 14th and 15th amendments and the eventual although delayed extension of rights of citizenship to the former slaves She also gives insufficient weight to the manner in which the war ultimately came to reunite the North and the South which had been bitter enemies during the conflict and in the immediate years thereafter But there will be few readers who will be tempted to romanticize the Civil War after reading Faust s account Her study reminded me of the terrible price Americans have had to pay to secure the government and the liberties we hold dear and all too freuently take for grantedRobin Friedman The Avion My Uncle Flew years thereafter But there will be few readers who will be tempted to romanticize the Civil War after reading Faust s account Her study reminded me of the terrible price Americans have had to pay to secure the government and the liberties we hold dear and all too freuently take for grantedRobin Friedman

Read & Download This Republic of Suffering Death and the American Civil War

This Republic of Suffering Death and the American Civil War

Read Þ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ç Drew Gilpin Faust Read & Download This Republic of Suffering Death and the American Civil War ê PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Drew Gilpin Faust Ç 5 Read & Download An illuminating study of the American struggle to comprehend the meaning and practicalities of death in the face of the unprecedented carnage of the Civil War During the war approximately 620000 soldiers lost their lives An euivalent proportion of today's population would be six million This Republic of Suffering explores the impact of this enormous death toll from every angle material political intellectual and spiritual The eminent historian Drew Gilpin Faust delineates the ways death changed not only individual lives but the life of the nation and its. Through our great good fortune in our youth our hearts were touched with fire It was given to us to learn at the outset that life is a profound and passionate thing While we are permitted to scorn nothing but indifference and do not pretend to undervalue the worldly rewards of ambition we have seen with our own eyes beyond and above the gold fields the snowy heights of honor and it is for us to bear the report to those who come after us But above all we have learned that whether a man accepts from Fortune her spade and will look downward and dig or from Aspiration her axe and cord and will scale the ice the one and only success which it is his command is to bring to his work a mighty heart Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr Memorial Day Speech 1884 When I first opened this slim addition to the mountain of books on the American Civil War I worried that perhaps it would try to prove too much that it had some sort of precedent shaking hypothesis that it d try to prove I m not simply being crotchety though I m sure that plays a role But it seems to me that in order to get a history book published these days you have to take conventional wisdom and turn it on its end whether or not the conventional wisdom is wrong The formula as far as I can tell is nearly full proof Simply find a well known event or person and then write a book that tries to prove the opposite of whatever it is that we know about that eventperson At first blush I thought This Republic of Suffering was going down that road I was cued to this possibilty due to its anecdotal nature with much of its empirical support culled from the letters diaries and other writings of American Civil War contemporaries Turns out though that I was wrong and not for the first time and my fears never materialized This Republic of Suffering isn t trying to change Civil War scholarship reinterpret past events or attempt to prove that Robert E Lee s success came from a warlike leprechaun that lived in his impeccably groomed beard Rather it asks you to look at known events with a fresh eye and a new angle This angle one that is lacking in most history texts is empathy Some 620000 Americans both Union and Confederacy lost their lives in the Civil War Though battle deaths get the most attention author Drew Gilpin Faust President of Harvard University points out that the majority of fatalities were caused by disease and the cruely assorted vagaries of life falling trees lightning strikes suicide ACME rockets and the accidental imbibing of poison which should be a lesson to anyone drinking from unmarked bottles in abandoned farmhouses All those deaths worked out to 2% of the mid 19th century American population Today that would eual roughly 6 million fatalities Put in perspective men died in the Civil War than in the American Revolution War of 1812 Mexican American War Spanish American War World War I and World War II combined Those are just numbers though As Joseph Stalin so aptly noted A single death is a tragedy a million deaths a statistic Stalin makes a good point This is not a phrase I use often I assure you When we start dealing solely with numbers with percentages and numerical comparisons we lose sight of something fundamental Numbers for all their supposed precision are abstract concepts After all what do you picture when you imagine the number two or two thousandThere are times when numbers are meaningless or misleading or proferred as a stand in for a deeper truth A good example of this is the grossly inflated casualty figures for any number of battles fought throughout history This isn t the result of some inability to count rather a battlefield death is so psychologically shattering that it multiplies in the mind War is so terrible so frightening so much at the edge of human endurance that the human mind is unable to accurately recall it A soldier in battle sees ten enemy soldiers and remembers a thousand he sees one dead man and remembers ten A battle simply allows for no frame of reference this leaves the participants and the chroniclers casting about blindly in an attempt to convey the truth Faust s work is an attempts to provide a context for all the fallen soldiers This Republic of Suffering is a broad ranging survey of death and dying It begins at the micro level with the motivations of individual soldiers and their concept of the good death This engenders a discussion of religion and war and the importance to 19th century soldiers to die in God s good grace She also explores the psychological aspects of killing especially in an era in which military training consisted of hay foot straw foot Her discussion touches on research some of it controversial by Dave Grossman and SLA Marshall about the human aversion to taking human life In the Civil War overshooting was a notorious problem in particularly hot firefights entire regiments would shoot off their entire allotment of sixty or so rounds With the number of bullets flying around its hard to believe anyone survived The uestion is are these men intentionally mis shooting or are they just poorly trained Faust does not neglect the special circumstances of black troops many of them former slaves who had a special motivation to go to warCordelia Harvey sent south by the governor of Wisconsin to provide aid to the State s wounded wrote from Mississippi late in April 1864 to describe the anger and determination of back soldiers Since the Fort Pillow tragedy she explained our colored troops their officers are awaiting in breathless anxiety the action of GovernmentOur officers of negro regiments declare they will take no prisoners there is death to the rebel in every black mans sic eyes They are still but terrible They will fightThe larger portion of the book deals with the aftermath of battle It should be mentioned that this is in no way a military or political history of the Civil War This is the ugly stuff you usually don t hear about the following grimness upon which most movies and novels do not dwell the removal of bodies the collection of personal artifacts the identification and burial notification of families internments disinternments and finally the creation of national cemeteries and registries of the lost These details are often ignored or excised because they are not comfortable places to dwell It s easier as a reader to focus on the noble clash of arms and ideals and the socio historical reverberations of long ago events rather than the bloody bloated stinking silence that followed the thunder of the cannons The fact was however that thousands of bodies were scattered across hundreds of fields all around America And it was a monumental task to find them and bury them In This Republic of Suffering Faust explains how in the immediate aftermath of battle the bodies of soldiers were typically placed into mass graves officers were always treated better unless those officers commanded black troops Efforts were made to identify the men by their belongings in the age before dog tags were mandated but these were ad hoc attempts and there was no systematic graves and registration system though one would be created in the aftermath of war Frantic families received unreliable unofficial notices and often made somber pilgrimages in an attempt to locate their loved ones The father of Union officer Oliver Wendell Holmes later to be among the great Supreme Court jurists made just such a journey Of course capitalism was alive even in the 19th century and war was great for business The armies trailed a phalanx of embalmers and coffin salesmen and on the homefront store owners kept a ready supply of black crepe and other mourning wear Faust s book relies heavily on the writings of others and it is studded with excerpts and block uotations To her credit she does a splendid job of integrating these words with her own She has taken care placing these snippets so that the overall flow is smooth Just as important she has a good eye for finding extracts that are evocative and interesting the literary ualities of many Civil War soldiers despite a laissez faire approach to spelling and grammar is astounding Here Faust uotes from a soldier named Ambrose Bierce who went on to have some success in the world of lettersMen There were men enough all dead apparently except one who lay near where I had halted my platoona Federal sergeant variously hurt who had been a fine giant in his time He lay face upward taking his breath in convulsive rattling snorts and blowing it out in sputters of froth which crawled creamily down his cheeks piling itself alongside his neck and ears A bullet had clipped a groove in his skull above the temple from this the brain protruded in bosses dropping off in flakes and strings I had not previously known one could get on even in this unsatisfactory fashion with so little brain One of my men whom I knew for a womanish fellow asked if he should put his bayonet through him Inexpressibly shocked by the cold blooded proposal I told him I thought not it was unusual and too many men were lookingI mentioned this previously but This Republic of Suffering has a different focus than most Civil War histories It is interested in the results of battles not the battles themselves Accordingly I came across a lot of subjects that I hadn t read about or read much about in the works of Foote Catton McPherson or Sears For instance there is a relatively long chapter devoted to the role religion played in the war how it provided rationalization for the conflict and solace to the bereaved It also provided fertile ground for charlatans who conducted seances and conversed with the dead Faust tells of one published book in which dead men told their stories of heaven unknown to readers all the dead men were fictional The section in the book describing how the US Burial Corps tried to find bodies in the South managed to infuriate me Southern states not only refused to help recover bodies but they actively desecrated Union graves This ignoble reality helped lead to the creation of national cemeteries When I read this I couldn t help wondering whether the South s reimagining of the war as a lost cause was just them being poor losers or rooted in something Frankly I have my suspicions To Frederick Douglass s despair the reasons for which men had died had been all but subsumed by the fact of their deaths Death has no power to change moral ualities he insisted in a Decoration Day speech in 1883 Whatever else I may forget the aging abolitionist declared I shall never forget the difference between those who fought for liberty and those who fought for slaveryBack to Stalin s uote for a moment and then I promise no Stalin The great value in this book is that it starts to give depth resonance and meaning to the numbers When you read for example that 3000 men died at Antietam you might think of the times you ve counted to 3000 or seen 3000 of anyting and you make a judgment as to whether that number is small or large And then you pass on This Republic of Suffering makes you stop and imagine what 3000 corpses would look like on a grassy meadow or a sunken dirt lane or a field of wheat It asks you imagine the infinite capacities for thought love ingenuity and passion contained within each human brain and soul and how the loss of each man reverberated outwards like the concentric rings of a rock thrown in a lake and it reuests that you multiply those capacities by 3000 and eventually 620000It is only a thought exercise of course You soon arrive at the realization that the imagination cannot go to those places Every death ended a story that couldn t have been told in a 100000 page book It is not in gross numbers but in individuals that you reckon the cost of war The Mortal Heart Beautiful Creatures The Untold Stories #1 youth our hearts were touched with fire It was given to us to learn at the outset that life is a profound and passionate thing While we are permitted to scorn nothing but indifference and do not pretend to undervalue the worldly rewards of ambition we have seen with our own eyes beyond and above the gold fields the snowy heights of honor and it is for us to bear the report to those who come after us But above all we have learned that whether a man accepts from Fortune her spade and will look downward and dig or from Aspiration her axe and cord and will scale the ice the one and only success which it is his command is to bring to his work a mighty heart Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr Memorial Day Speech 1884 When I first opened this slim addition to the mountain of books on the American Civil War I worried that perhaps it would try to prove too much that it had some sort of precedent shaking hypothesis that it d try to prove I m not simply being crotchety though I m sure that plays a role But it seems to me that in order to get a history book published these days Wild West True Stories you have to take conventional wisdom and turn it on its end whether or not the conventional wisdom is wrong The formula as far as I can tell is nearly full proof Simply find a well known event or person and then write a book that tries to prove the opposite of whatever it is that we know about that eventperson At first blush I thought This Republic of Suffering was going down that road I was cued to this possibilty due to its anecdotal nature with much of its empirical support culled from the letters diaries and other writings of American Civil War contemporaries Turns out though that I was wrong and not for the first time and my fears never materialized This Republic of Suffering isn t trying to change Civil War scholarship reinterpret past events or attempt to prove that Robert E Lee s success came from a warlike leprechaun that lived in his impeccably groomed beard Rather it asks Aramaic Light on Genesis you to look at known events with a fresh eye and a new angle This angle one that is lacking in most history texts is empathy Some 620000 Americans both Union and Confederacy lost their lives in the Civil War Though battle deaths get the most attention author Drew Gilpin Faust President of Harvard University points out that the majority of fatalities were caused by disease and the cruely assorted vagaries of life falling trees lightning strikes suicide ACME rockets and the accidental imbibing of poison which should be a lesson to anyone drinking from unmarked bottles in abandoned farmhouses All those deaths worked out to 2% of the mid 19th century American population Today that would eual roughly 6 million fatalities Put in perspective men died in the Civil War than in the American Revolution War of 1812 Mexican American War Spanish American War World War I and World War II combined Those are just numbers though As Joseph Stalin so aptly noted A single death is a tragedy a million deaths a statistic Stalin makes a good point This is not a phrase I use often I assure 伊藤潤二恐怖マンガ collection 6 双一の呪いの日記 you When we start dealing solely with numbers with percentages and numerical comparisons we lose sight of something fundamental Numbers for all their supposed precision are abstract concepts After all what do درد زمانه you picture when Early Medieval Universe History of Art and Architecture you imagine the number two or two thousandThere are times when numbers are meaningless or misleading or proferred as a stand in for a deeper truth A good example of this is the grossly inflated casualty figures for any number of battles fought throughout history This isn t the result of some inability to count rather a battlefield death is so psychologically shattering that it multiplies in the mind War is so terrible so frightening so much at the edge of human endurance that the human mind is unable to accurately recall it A soldier in battle sees ten enemy soldiers and remembers a thousand he sees one dead man and remembers ten A battle simply allows for no frame of reference this leaves the participants and the chroniclers casting about blindly in an attempt to convey the truth Faust s work is an attempts to provide a context for all the fallen soldiers This Republic of Suffering is a broad ranging survey of death and dying It begins at the micro level with the motivations of individual soldiers and their concept of the good death This engenders a discussion of religion and war and the importance to 19th century soldiers to die in God s good grace She also explores the psychological aspects of killing especially in an era in which military training consisted of hay foot straw foot Her discussion touches on research some of it controversial by Dave Grossman and SLA Marshall about the human aversion to taking human life In the Civil War overshooting was a notorious problem in particularly hot firefights entire regiments would shoot off their entire allotment of sixty or so rounds With the number of bullets flying around its hard to believe anyone survived The uestion is are these men intentionally mis shooting or are they just poorly trained Faust does not neglect the special circumstances of black troops many of them former slaves who had a special motivation to go to warCordelia Harvey sent south by the governor of Wisconsin to provide aid to the State s wounded wrote from Mississippi late in April 1864 to describe the anger and determination of back soldiers Since the Fort Pillow tragedy she explained our colored troops their officers are awaiting in breathless anxiety the action of GovernmentOur officers of negro regiments declare they will take no prisoners there is death to the rebel in every black mans sic eyes They are still but terrible They will fightThe larger portion of the book deals with the aftermath of battle It should be mentioned that this is in no way a military or political history of the Civil War This is the ugly stuff Freakshow Misadventures in the Counterculture 1959 1971 you usually don t hear about the following grimness upon which most movies and novels do not dwell the removal of bodies the collection of personal artifacts the identification and burial notification of families internments disinternments and finally the creation of national cemeteries and registries of the lost These details are often ignored or excised because they are not comfortable places to dwell It s easier as a reader to focus on the noble clash of arms and ideals and the socio historical reverberations of long ago events rather than the bloody bloated stinking silence that followed the thunder of the cannons The fact was however that thousands of bodies were scattered across hundreds of fields all around America And it was a monumental task to find them and bury them In This Republic of Suffering Faust explains how in the immediate aftermath of battle the bodies of soldiers were typically placed into mass graves officers were always treated better unless those officers commanded black troops Efforts were made to identify the men by their belongings in the age before dog tags were mandated but these were ad hoc attempts and there was no systematic graves and registration system though one would be created in the aftermath of war Frantic families received unreliable unofficial notices and often made somber pilgrimages in an attempt to locate their loved ones The father of Union officer Oliver Wendell Holmes later to be among the great Supreme Court jurists made just such a journey Of course capitalism was alive even in the 19th century and war was great for business The armies trailed a phalanx of embalmers and coffin salesmen and on the homefront store owners kept a ready supply of black crepe and other mourning wear Faust s book relies heavily on the writings of others and it is studded with excerpts and block uotations To her credit she does a splendid job of integrating these words with her own She has taken care placing these snippets so that the overall flow is smooth Just as important she has a good eye for finding extracts that are evocative and interesting the literary ualities of many Civil War soldiers despite a laissez faire approach to spelling and grammar is astounding Here Faust uotes from a soldier named Ambrose Bierce who went on to have some success in the world of lettersMen There were men enough all dead apparently except one who lay near where I had halted my platoona Federal sergeant variously hurt who had been a fine giant in his time He lay face upward taking his breath in convulsive rattling snorts and blowing it out in sputters of froth which crawled creamily down his cheeks piling itself alongside his neck and ears A bullet had clipped a groove in his skull above the temple from this the brain protruded in bosses dropping off in flakes and strings I had not previously known one could get on even in this unsatisfactory fashion with so little brain One of my men whom I knew for a womanish fellow asked if he should put his bayonet through him Inexpressibly shocked by the cold blooded proposal I told him I thought not it was unusual and too many men were lookingI mentioned this previously but This Republic of Suffering has a different focus than most Civil War histories It is interested in the results of battles not the battles themselves Accordingly I came across a lot of subjects that I hadn t read about or read much about in the works of Foote Catton McPherson or Sears For instance there is a relatively long chapter devoted to the role religion played in the war how it provided rationalization for the conflict and solace to the bereaved It also provided fertile ground for charlatans who conducted seances and conversed with the dead Faust tells of one published book in which dead men told their stories of heaven unknown to readers all the dead men were fictional The section in the book describing how the US Burial Corps tried to find bodies in the South managed to infuriate me Southern states not only refused to help recover bodies but they actively desecrated Union graves This ignoble reality helped lead to the creation of national cemeteries When I read this I couldn t help wondering whether the South s reimagining of the war as a lost cause was just them being poor losers or rooted in something Frankly I have my suspicions To Frederick Douglass s despair the reasons for which men had died had been all but subsumed by the fact of their deaths Death has no power to change moral ualities he insisted in a Decoration Day speech in 1883 Whatever else I may forget the aging abolitionist declared I shall never forget the difference between those who fought for liberty and those who fought for slaveryBack to Stalin s uote for a moment and then I promise no Stalin The great value in this book is that it starts to give depth resonance and meaning to the numbers When Pompeii at Dusk you read for example that 3000 men died at Antietam Escape from Kathmandu you might think of the times Talked to Death The Life and Murder of Alan Berg you ve counted to 3000 or seen 3000 of anyting and More Relaxing Less Taxing you make a judgment as to whether that number is small or large And then Diana Palmer Duets #1 Sweet EnemyLove on Trial you pass on This Republic of Suffering makes Escape from Kathmandu you stop and imagine what 3000 corpses would look like on a grassy meadow or a sunken dirt lane or a field of wheat It asks Alongshore you imagine the infinite capacities for thought love ingenuity and passion contained within each human brain and soul and how the loss of each man reverberated outwards like the concentric rings of a rock thrown in a lake and it reuests that The Easter Witch you multiply those capacities by 3000 and eventually 620000It is only a thought exercise of course You soon arrive at the realization that the imagination cannot go to those places Every death ended a story that couldn t have been told in a 100000 page book It is not in gross numbers but in individuals that How do i Delete Books on Kindle: The Picture Step by Step Guide on How to Remove Books from All Kindle Devices in less than 5 minutes for Complete Novice you reckon the cost of war

Read Þ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ç Drew Gilpin Faust

Read Þ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ç Drew Gilpin Faust Read & Download This Republic of Suffering Death and the American Civil War ê PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Drew Gilpin Faust Ç 5 Read & Download Y battlefield dead the resulting rise of undertaking as a profession the first widespread use of embalming the gradual emergence of military graves registration procedures the development of a federal system of national cemeteries for Union dead and the creation of private cemeteries in the South that contributed to the cult of the Lost Cause She shows too how the war victimized civilians through violence that extended beyond battlefields from disease displacement hardships shortages emotional wounds and conflicts connected to the disintegration of slaver. Drew Gilpin Faust s The Republic of Suffering is a necessary and long overdue cultural history of a largely ignored aspect of the Civil War Basically it s a history of Death on a massive scale in what many historians view as the first modern war and how society or societies North and South dealt with such losses There were of course differences in how the North and South did deal with such losses especially when it came to locating bodies for reburial For the North location and reburial in National Cemeteries became a Government effort which excluded the Confederate dead for the South the efforts were of a grassroots nature performed by a number of groups Nevertheless both societies believed in the importance of the Good Death a theme that Faust returns to again and again throughout her book The Civil War did do damage to the Good Death concept for a number of reasons Essentially a good death featured within the popular imagination of the time the family gathered around the loved one while sweet sad things were said and Christian resolve mustered before departure to the great beyond Personally I don t find that concept dated and can only hope for something similar when my time comes On the War front the problem of bodies being blown apart not ever found and identified long periods where the fate of a soldier could not be found out due to the poor flow of information created an unending sense of anxiety for families in both the North and South In other areas and less obvious but also important were changing attitudes toward the Bible Heaven and Hell Emily Dickenson who Faust points out penned a great number of her poems during the War also happened to populate her poems with war imagery and of course death On reading this one particular line from Dickenson came uickly to mind and I think sums up the great anxiety and fears of the age and with her typically powerful economy Parting is all we know of heaven and all we need of hell Overall Faust is a sure guide who maintains the even tone of an academic but one with a humane touch This is a book filled with enormous heartache as anecdote after anecdote drives home But it is also forward looking showing that lessons were learned as the Government and civilians were forced to respond to an avalanche of dead missing and wounded with initially no responsive and supportive structures in place That would change There were shortcomings galore but also many successes as concrete efforts were made to find and identify the dead provide a final resting places for their remains and thus bringing final closure to so many who had lost so much One of the great paradoxes of the War with its mass destruction was the growing appreciation of the individual Thousands died but there was a refusal to see that fact as simply numbers andor disposable cogs in a military machine And that for me was the gleaming hopeful thread that ran throughout this sad book